Session 2 - What Can We Learn About CQI From the Health and Social Service Sectors? 1/25/17

January 25, 2017 at 1:30 pm ET
Presenter Biographies: 
  • Anne Douglass, Ph.D. is Associate Professor and Founding Executive Director at the Institute for Early Education Leadership and Innovation at UMass Boston. Her work focuses on re-imagining leadership development and quality improvement in early care and education research, policy, and practice.  She designs programs, systems, and policies to support individual and collaborative leadership for change and innovation among early educators, with a focus on strengthening family engagement practices. She brings almost 20 years of expertise as an urban early educator to this work, as a teacher, administrator, family child care owner and educator, professional development trainer, and organizational improvement consultant.  Her experience as a practitioner working directly with children, families, and teachers informs her deep respect for the expertise of early educators as the drivers of transformative change to promote school readiness for all children.  She has a PhD in Social Policy from Brandeis University, a master’s in education from Harvard University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Wellesley College.
  • Tamara Halle, Ph.D. is a Senior Scholar at Child Trends. Tamara’s recent work focuses on promoting children’s school readiness, the optimal development of dual language learners, and the application of implementation science frameworks to early care and education initiatives. She is the Project Director of the Culture of Continuous Learning Project and is the co-Principal Investigator on the Child Care and Early Care and Education Policy Research and Analysis project, both funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.
  • Kathryn Tout, Ph.D. co-directs Early Childhood Research at Child Trends. She conducts research and evaluation to understand and identify best practices in Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS), professional development for early childhood educators, early childhood curriculum and assessment, and family engagement in early care and education settings. She is the Principal Investigator of the Culture of Continuous Learning Project and is the co-Principal Investigator on the Child Care and Early Care and Education Policy Research and Analysis project, both funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.
Pre-Session Assignments: 
Please review the following assignments before the webinar.

1. The Trauma-Informed Early Care and Education Breakthrough Series Collaborative 
This study investigated the use of a Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) to promote the adoption of trauma-informed practices in ECE programs in low-income neighborhoods of Boston. The scientific literature on organizational change and learning reveals numerous barriers to the adoption of new practices. The BSC improvement methodology was designed to overcome many of these barriers, and has been implemented widely in the health care field.  This study investigated the application of the BSC methodology in the ECE context to learn:   
  • How did ECE programs improve and sustain trauma-informed practices as a result of the BSC?
  • How did these changes impact children, family, program staff, systems?
The project was implemented by the Boston Public Health Commission, and evaluated by Anne Douglass at the University of Massachusetts Boston.
 


Power Point: