Learning Tables Archive

2016 Supporting Continuous Quality Improvement in Family Child Care: Peer Learning Group

The National Center for Early Childhood Quality Assurance, in partnership with the BUILD Initiative, worked with teams who were eager to strengthen relationship-based, developmentally appropriate early learning experiences for children in family child care through family child care (FCC) networks or collaborative partnership support systems. The Supporting Continuous Quality Improvement in Family Child Care peer learning group was a five-part professional learning opportunity for teams made up of state, regional, and local stakeholders.  
 

2016 Conversations on Access and Quality for Infants and Toddlers: Peer Learning Group

The National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance, the BUILD Initiative, and the State Capacity Building Center’s Infant/Toddler Specialist Network worked with state teams to consider systems and policy work around infants and toddlers in their States. The peer learning group was a professional learning opportunity for impact teams (made up of state, regional, and/or local stakeholders). The peer learning group provided an overview of the essential policies of infant and toddler care followed by additional discussion-based webinars on the following areas.
 
The period from birth to three years of age is marked by extraordinary growth across all developmental domains. Development during this period is rapid, dynamic, and sensitive to social, physical, biological, and environmental inputs. A child’s experiences from birth to three influence how he or she develops, learns, and interacts with the world, and set the foundation for all future learning and development. Several core principles related to the growth of infants, toddlers, and two-year-olds are critical to delivering the highest-quality services: 
    • Early relationships are most important and central to young children’s development. 
    • Development occurs simultaneously across multiple interdependent domains.
    • Children develop and learn at their own unique pace and in the context of their family, culture, and community.
    • Children from birth to three learn and master new skills through play.
These core principles, coupled with the Program for Infant/Toddler Care’s six essential program policies—primary care, small groups, continuity of care, individualized care, cultural continuity, and inclusion of children with disabilities or other special needs—provide a strong framework for early care and education policies and practices across all settings.
 

2016 State Policy Learning Table

In 2016, the BUILD Initiative and the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) entered Year 2 of the project to learn from and with state leaders how to effectively implement policy that promotes professional learning, positive teaching conditions, culturally relevant teaching practices and credentialing and licensing systems that promote effective early childhood teaching and learning for children from birth through 3rd grade. Valuable tools such as research briefs, reports, articles, and state examples as well as PowerPoint presentations can be found on the landing pad.

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2016 Quality Investments: How to Use Administrative Data and Other Sources to Evaluate What is Working

The National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance and its partners will host a three-part webinar series titled Quality Investments: How To Use Administrative Data and Other Sources To Evaluate What Is Working. The series will examine evaluation options and implementation strategies to help States and Territories identify the resources, data sources, and costs associated with evaluating quality initiatives, with a particular focus on evaluation related to Child Care and Development Fund quality activities. The webinars were held on March 24, April 21, and June 2. 

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2015 Dual Language Learners Learning Table

An English language development (ELD) approach recognizes the benefits of the strategic use and continued development of the home language to the acquisition of English during the preschool years. A new BUILD report that scanned early learning and development standards for preschool-aged children in 23 states showed that many states have moved toward this approach. Yet, the report also revealed that more work needs to be done to align an ELD approach within the components of the early learning system (e.g., assessment, workforce competencies, instructional guidance, etc.) in order to drive high quality services that will improve outcomes for young DLLs and their families.  

In this Learning Table, state teams had an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the English Language Development approach, and work together to examine challenges and plan strategies to strengthen a particular component of their system. State teams will benefit from individualized webinars, coaching, and tailored technical assistance to develop a plan of action to address a selected component that needs attention in order to create meaningful change for young DLLs and their families.

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2015 State Policy Learning Table

The BUILD Initiative and the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) have embarked on an initiative to examine the ways that prominent policy levers, such as program quality standards, QRIS and teacher evaluation systems, promote effective early childhood teaching and learning. We know that these policies must be implemented at a sufficient scale and depth at the local level to promote effective teaching from birth through age 8. Through this Learning Table on State Policy and Supports to Promote Effective Teaching and Learning, six states participated in one in-person meeting and four interactive webinars facilitated by national experts. 

Valuable tools such as research briefs, reports, articles, and state examples can be found on each session page under Resource Materials. PowerPoint presentations are also available for each session.

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2015 Financing Quality Through Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) Collaborative Action Team

BUILD Initiative’s QRIS National Learning Network partnered with the Office of Child Care’s National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement on this Collaborative Action Team.

Effective QRIS finance incorporates strategies to support and sustain QRIS administration as well as ongoing financial support for service providers. The Collaborative Action Team facilitated learning about various approaches to QRIS finance with national experts and teams from nine states/territories. This series was presented through four sessions: one webinar, one in-person meeting and two additional webinars. Each session was interactive and helped participants think about new solutions or modifications to their design and financing of a high quality early education system. Valuable tools such as research briefs, reports, articles, and state examples can be found on each session page under Resource Materials. PowerPoint presentations are also available for each session.

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2014 Monitoring Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) Learning Table

BUILD Initiative’s QRIS National Learning Network partnered with the Office of Child Care’s National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement on this Learning Table.

Cost effective and efficient administration of a QRIS is supported by accountable and effective program monitoring. Additionally, a successful monitoring system supports providers’ continuous quality improvement.

This Learning Table was comprised of three interactive webinars designed to support the 11 participating states in examining current practices and using new ideas to improve their monitoring systems. The sessions included opportunities for participants to discuss the design and implementation of a monitoring system – including traditional and alternative monitoring strategies – with national experts and other states. A collection of resources accompanied each session.

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2014 Diversity/Equity Learning Table

Six states participated in a BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network-supported Learning Table on the topic of assuring that state Quality Rating and Improvement Systems are responsive to children who are culturally, linguistically and socio-economically diverse.

This Learning Table series included one in-person meeting, on May 5th through 7th, and four web-based sessions. Participants also had access to an electronic collection of resources related to the topic of each event. Sessions featured national experts and focus areas included:

  • How are you engaging and supporting families who are culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse in your state early childhood system?
  • How are you improving experiences for young children who are culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse?
  • How are you improving experiences for young dual language learners (DLLs)?
  • How are you growing the capacity of your workforce and consultants to support young children who are culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse?

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2014 Continuous Quality Improvement in Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) Learning Table

The 2014 Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in QRIS Learning Table was designed to explore the role of CQI in defining or redefining the QRIS. Setting and monitoring standards and other accountability structures alone may not engage programs, directors and teams to initiate and own the change necessary to improve the program quality to a level that will lead to positive child outcomes. To support an overall CQI approach, states must offer programs, directors and partners a framework and structure that focuses the conversation on a CQI approach at all levels.

This Learning Table series included one in-person meeting, on March 26th and 27th, and four interactive web-based sessions. Participants also had access to an electronic collection of resources related to the topic of each interactive event. Each web-based session focused on an individual theme within the broad frame of Continuous Quality Improvement and was designed to be very interactive with discussion and sharing among participating states. State teams were offered follow-up technical assistance in order to more directly tailor the content to the individual needs of the state.

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Creating an Effective Technical Assistance System to Develop High Quality Early Learning Programs

As states move beyond establishing quality standards and applying ratings within a QRIS framework, the focus is shifting to providing supports, resources and practices that can assist programs to methodically improve quality and outcomes for children. The BUILD Initiative’s QRIS National Learning Network, National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), and the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), provided a technical assistance program to states focused on "Creating an Effective Technical Assistance System to Develop High Quality Early Learning Programs." As part of the Learning Table, state teams engaged in a structured dialogue with national experts and other state teams to assess their current state technical assistance system on four levels (early learning programs, technical assistance professionals, supervisor/sponsoring agencies, and finally the state level). With assistance from our resource team, states created an implementation plan to establish a more effective and efficient technical assistance system that can promote high quality early care and learning programs and achieve better outcomes for children.

View Archived Group A Effective Technical Assistance Learning Table
View Archived Group B Effective Technical Assistance Learning Table

Standards-Based QRIS Learning Table

BUILD Initiative’s QRIS National Learning Network partnered with the Office of Child Care’s National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement on this Learning Table.

The efficiency and implementation expense of a QRIS is directly influenced by the complexity, extent and content of its standards and of the procedures to assess compliance with its standards. Provider participation rates and state costs are shaped by QRIS efficiency. Similarly, the degree to which a QRIS genuinely engages programs across the sectors of ECE (e.g., centers, homes, schools, Head Start and Early Head Start) is directly related to both the content of its standards and the ease of the application and documentation processes for its standards.

This Learning Table collectively offered guiding principles and recommendations for the development and revision of QRIS standards and state policy changes to support implementing an effective and efficient Quality Rating and Improvement System.

View Archived Developing a Standards-Based QRIS Learning Table
View Archived Revising a Standards-Based QRIS Learning Table

Evidence-Based Approaches to Building Quality for Diverse Young Learners in State Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)

In 2012, states participated in a BUILD Initiative and QRIS National Learning Network-supported Learning Table related to building quality services and supports for young children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families. The below link will provide you access to a plethora of resource materials on this topic, PowerPoint presentations, etc. For states that are thinking about how to create a QRIS that responds to the needs of all young children and their families, of whatever race, culture and language, you will find here a collection of helpful resources.

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Outcomes Based QRIS

This Learning Table series was designed to help state QRIS leaders who were in the process of developing or implementing their QRIS use real-life policy and system questions as content for peer-group learning. The intention of the Learning Table was to support states in asking critical questions and thinking through their QRIS design, so that they can learn from other states and build these systems more quickly and effectively. The resources from this Learning Table (held in 2011) are available to you for review by clicking on the link below.

View Archived Learning Table